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The shooting in Santa Fe, Texas

Published on: Author: Ernest Metzger Leave a comment
Ernest Metzger

The shooting on 18 May at a school in Santa Fe, Texas, was as awful as its predecessors and, in one respect, worse: the murderer used particular firearms that the law can barely touch. So the shooting is unlikely to provoke action among legislators, and may in fact retard it. State and federal laws restrict… Continue reading

The Lockerbie bombing: reviewing the convictions of those who have died

Published on: Author: Ruth O'Donnell Leave a comment

The Scottish Criminal Cases Review Commission (SCCRC) has announced that it is to review the conviction of Abdelbaset al-Megrahi for the Lockerbie bombing. The timeline of the case is a complex one. It is set out in more detail here, but in brief, al-Megrahi was convicted in 2001 and sentenced to life imprisonment. An initial… Continue reading

Can courts improve how they communicate with jurors in criminal trials?

Published on: Author: Ruth O'Donnell 1 Comment

Today sees the publication of an evidence review, commissioned by the Scottish Government, into methods of conveying information to jurors. The review, which was undertaken by Professor James Chalmers and Professor Fiona Leverick, is part of a wider project of jury research, which also includes a major mock jury study and a second evidence review… Continue reading

Major programme of mock jury research

Published on: Author: Ruth O'Donnell Leave a comment

Researchers from the School of Law at the University of Glasgow are about to embark on what will be the largest study of mock jury decision making ever undertaken in the UK. Professor James Chalmers and Professor Fiona Leverick are part of a team of researchers who have been commissioned by the Scottish Government to… Continue reading

No, “not proven” did not come first

Published on: Author: Ruth O'Donnell 3 Comments

The Scottish Government’s announcement of a two year programme of jury research, which we are delighted to be carrying out along with Ipsos MORI Scotland and Vanessa Munro of the University of Warwick, has yet again brought Scots law’s unusual “not proven” verdict to public attention. One particular aspect of this debate is frustrating. For… Continue reading

The Sir Gerald Gordon Seminar on Criminal Law

Published on: Author: Ruth O'Donnell Leave a comment

Report by Professor Fiona Leverick, School of Law: On 13 June 2017, the annual Sir Gerald Gordon seminar on criminal law took place at the University of Glasgow, supported by the Clark Foundation for Legal Education and the Faculty of Advocates, and attended by Sir Gerald himself. The seminar is now in its ninth year.… Continue reading

On civil remedies and the crime of rape

Published on: Author: Ruth O'Donnell Leave a comment

The decision in the case of DC v DG & DR which was published last Tuesday is potentially of huge significance for the Scots law of rape. The facts were that DC alleged that she had been raped, while extremely drunk, by two professional footballers on 2nd January 2011. She reported the incident to the… Continue reading

The Leverhulme Trust: “Collections” Scholarships

Published on: Author: Ruth O'Donnell Leave a comment

Collections: an Enlightenment Pedagogy for the 21st Century It is well known that in the three hundred years since the Enlightenment, knowledge worldwide has made giant steps – but that at the same time, this knowledge has become compartmentalised. Increasingly narrow specialisms deliver insight and technological advances – at a price. Knowledge reflects depth, but… Continue reading

Gordon Seminar on Criminal Law 2017: Postgraduate Call for Papers

Published on: Author: James Chalmers Leave a comment

The ninth annual Gerald Gordon Seminar on Criminal Law will be held at the University of Glasgow on Tuesday 13 June 2017, supported by the Clark Foundation for Legal Education and the Faculty of Advocates. Speakers will include the following: Professor Peter Alldridge (Queen Mary) Dr Kevin Brown (Queen’s University Belfast) Ilona Cairns (Aberdeen) Professor… Continue reading

On Zombie Legislation

Published on: Author: Ruth O'Donnell Leave a comment

Two weeks ago saw the Scottish Parliament vote in favour of repealing the much-criticised Offensive Behaviour at Football and Threatening Communications (S) Act 2012. While the vote is merely advisory, and for now the Scottish Government have undertaken to review the legislation, it creates an interesting new category of ‘zombie’ legislation. It has not yet… Continue reading